Pruning Blackberry Bushes: How And When To Prune Blackberry Bushes

 

pruning wild blackberry bushes

Blackberry Planting, Care, Pruning and Harvesting Instructions. Blackberries are often considered one of the easiest fruits to grow at home. They are a native species to the United States and grow as a small shrub or trailing vine. The fruit from this plant can be used for table fruit, syrup, jams and jelly. Plant when the canes are dormant, preferably in early spring. Planting may also be done in late fall, however, it should be delayed until early spring in very cold areas as low temperatures could kill some hybrid varieties. Blackberries and their hybrids are all self-fertile, so multiple plants /5(). May 17,  · Blackberry bushes bear best and most abundantly when they’re properly pruned. Here’s how to prune blackberry bushes for the best harvest! For those of us who grew up gathering loads of blackberries from wild-growing brambles, it may come as a surprise that blackberries yield the largest and best crops when they’re carefully pruned.



Blackberry bushes flourish in the wild along roadsides with bushy thick vegetation, as pruning wild blackberry bushes as in fields, near the ocean shore, in woodlands or on mountains.

Wild blackberries are rich in vitamin C and can be made into jams, sauces, eaten fresh and chilled or tossed into desserts. Since wild blackberries grow tall and thorny, the arching canes need to be pruned to encourage future fruit harvest and to keep growth under control.

Wear gloves because blackberry plants are very thorny. Clear weeds from around the base of the plant. Cut back and remove from the ground any blackberry plants within 2 feet of the plant so the area doesn't get too crowded.

Prune back any canes that are dead, broken or diseased first. Then cut back canes that are thinner than the others and appear weaker, as these canes won't produce fruit but suck energy from the healthier parts of the blackberry bush. Prune with bypass pruners all first-year canes to 3 feet in midsummer. This encourages lateral branching on young plants.

You can identify young blackberry plants because they only have one cane that is a couple feet tall, pruning wild blackberry bushes. Support the plant using a system such as a trellis or a stake. This will improve the chances of the plant surviving in the wild. Use twine to secure each lateral branch to the stake or system as pruning wild blackberry bushes grows. Prune off suckers with the pruning scissors.

Suckers grow from the outside of the canes as small shoots that suck energy and nutrients from the rest of the blackberry plant. For larger blackberry plants, prune the remaining canes so they are no more than 7 feet tall. Tip Blackberry thorns can inflict painful wounds. Whenever you work around them, or any bramble fruit, wear thick leather gloves; long, pruning wild blackberry bushes, sturdy jeans or trousers; and a long-sleeved shirt, pruning wild blackberry bushes.

To avoid direct contact when you're pruning, grasp the canes with long-handled barbecue tongs. Up Next. Take Care of Wild Blackberries. Stake Raspberry Plants. Related Articles. Grow Tame Blackberries.

Growing Marionberries. Grow Thornless Blackberries. Grow Blackberries in Pots. Copyright Leaf Group Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

pruning wild blackberry bushes

 

Plant when the canes are dormant, preferably in early spring. Planting may also be done in late fall, however, it should be delayed until early spring in very cold areas as low temperatures could kill some hybrid varieties. Blackberries and their hybrids are all self-fertile, so multiple plants /5(). Nov 28,  · Blackberries (Rubus spp.) are brambles, like raspberries, and require similar pruning. Although you may associate brambles with thorns, there are both thorny and thornless varieties of . Blackberry Planting, Care, Pruning and Harvesting Instructions. Blackberries are often considered one of the easiest fruits to grow at home. They are a native species to the United States and grow as a small shrub or trailing vine. The fruit from this plant can be used for table fruit, syrup, jams and jelly.